South Korea antitrust regulator says investigating Apple on 'some matters'

SEOUL South Korea's Fair Trade Commission (FTC) is investigating "some matters" relating to tech giant Apple Inc, the head of the anticompetition body said during a parliamentary hearing, without disclosing further details. Speaking at the hearing on Tuesday, FTC Chairman Jeong Jae-chan declined to comment on the specifics of the regulator's investigation when asked to do so by a South Korean lawmaker. Domestic media reports said earlier this month the FTC was reviewing details of the U.S. firm's contracts with South Korean mobile telecoms carriers. Apple didn't immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment. (Reporting by Se Young Lee; Editing by Kenneth Maxwell)

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UPDATE 1-Bombardier to get $1 bln investment from Quebec

(Adds details)June 23 Planemaker Bombardier Inc said on Thursday the Canadian province of Quebec agreed to invest $1 billion in its C series aircraft program, which has struggled with years of delays and cost overruns.Bombardier said it would transfer the assets, liabilities and obligations of the program to a newly created limited partnership, in which the company will hold a 50.5 percent equity stake and Quebec the rest. The investment will be made in two installments of $500 million, with the first on June 30 and the second on Sept. 1, the Montreal-based company said. Bombardier will maintain operational control of the program and consolidate its financial results. The limited partnership's board will consist of five directors, three of whom will be proposed by Bombardier and two by Quebec. (Reporting by Vishaka George in Bengaluru; Editing by Anil D'Silva)

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Congo almost runs out of yellow fever vaccine amid epidemic

KINSHASA Democratic Republic of Congo has almost run out of yellow fever vaccine in Kinshasa, in the same week that the government declared an epidemic of the disease in the packed capital and two other provinces.Some local people have complained they were denied immunization due to the shortage, despite queueing for a shot. More supplies have been promised, but health officials in the impoverished country say they have to choose between the high cost of flying them in, or a long wait for shipment by sea.The mosquito-borne hemorrhagic virus is a major concern in Kinshasa, a city of about 12 million people which has poor health services, a humid climate beloved of the insects and much stagnant water where they can breed owing to pour drainage.Health minister Felix Kabange said on Monday that 67 cases had been confirmed in Kinshasa, Kongo Central and Kwango provinces and that over 1,000 more suspected cases are being monitored. Five people have died from the disease.The government and international health organizations vaccinated more than 2 million people, about half of them in Kinshasa, between May 26 and June 4. But there is no more vaccine left, aside from a small number of doses left in reserve in Kongo Central and some being administered by a government agency at Kinshasa's central hospital, airport and river crossing with neighboring Congo Republic, health officials said.The agency is charging $35 for the doses it administers, a hefty sum in a country whose gross national income per person is estimated by the World Bank at $380 a year.Eugene Kabambi, the World Health Organization (WHO) spokesman in Congo, said that the International Coordinating Group on vaccine provision has promised Congo more than a million more doses. "That requires either a cargo flight, in which case it would come very quickly but cost a lot, or if it's by boat, it could take a few weeks," he told Reuters.The Coordinating Group brings together the WHO and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies plus the medical charity Médecins sans Frontières.The global stockpile of yellow fever vaccine has already been depleted twice this year to immunize people in Angola, Uganda and Congo. It stands at 6 million doses, but this may not be enough if there are simultaneous outbreaks in a number of highly-populated areas, experts warn.Almost 18 million doses have been distributed for emergency vaccination campaigns so far in the three African countries. QUEUES FOR VACCINESCongo has extensive experience of dealing with outbreaks of tropical diseases and the Ebola virus was first identified in the central African country. It earned plaudits in 2014 for quickly containing a local Ebola outbreak that killed 49 people in the country. By contrast an Ebola epidemic killed more than 11,300 as it swept through West Africa from 2013.Of the cases confirmed in the latest yellow fever outbreak, seven were locally transmitted in Congo. Another 58 were imported from Angola, where it began, and two came from remote forested areas not linked to the current outbreak. Symptoms of the disease include fever, body aches and nausea, although most people recover.In Kinshasa's Ndjili commune, a maze of narrow alleys and one of the health zones in the city targeted for vaccination in late May, many residents were unable to receive an injection before stocks ran out. "Everyone started coming, even from other districts. Near the end we realized that the vaccine was insufficient," said Murphy Nzuzi, a doctor at a dimly-lit health center in Ndjili with only a few small treatment rooms. He added that fights had broken out among people waiting in line.In a nearby market where trash collected in a small stream, residents said that some people had received vaccination papers while waiting in line but never got a shot. "When you present yourself, they give you the card that gives you access to the vaccine, but then there wasn't enough vaccine for everyone," said local resident Mama Mavungu.The current method for making vaccines, using chicken eggs, takes a year. Health authorities are considering using a fifth of the standard dose of vaccine - enough to immunize temporarily but not to give lifelong immunity - to maximize its availability, but no final decision has been made. (Editing by Tim Cocks and David Stamp)

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Wife of Orlando shooter knew of attack, could soon be charged: source

ORLANDO, Fla./WASHINGTON The wife of the gunman who killed 49 people at an Orlando gay nightclub knew of his plans for the attack and could soon be charged in connection with the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, a law enforcement source said on Tuesday. The source told Reuters that a federal grand jury had been convened and could charge Omar Mateen's wife, Noor Salman, as early as Wednesday."It appears she had some knowledge of what was going on," said U.S. Senator Angus King, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, which received a briefing on the attack on Tuesday. "She definitely is, I guess you would say, a person of interest right now and appears to be cooperating and can provide us with some important information," King told CNN. Mateen, who was shot dead by police after a three-hour standoff at the Pulse club early on Sunday, called 911 during his shooting spree to profess allegiance to various militant Islamist groups.Federal investigators have said he was likely self-radicalized and there was no evidence that he received any instructions or aid from outside groups such as Islamic State. Mateen, 29, was a U.S. citizen, born in New York of Afghan immigrant parents."He appears to have been an angry, disturbed, unstable young man who became radicalized," President Barack Obama told reporters. Mateen, who was a security guard, was systematic during his rampage, working his way through the packed club shooting people who were already down. He apparently wanted to ensure they were dead, said Angel Colon, a wounded survivor."I look over and he shoots the girl next to me and I was just there laying down and thinking: 'I'm next, I'm dead,'" he said.Mateen shot him twice more, one bullet apparently aimed for Colon's head striking his hand, and another hitting his hip, Colon said at Orlando Regional Medical Center, where he is one of 27 survivors being treated.FoxNews.com, citing an FBI source, said prosecutors were seeking to charge Mateen's wife as an accessory to 49 counts of murder and 53 counts of attempted murder and failure to notify law enforcement about the pending attack and lying to federal agents. NBC News said Salman told federal agents she tried to talk her husband out of carrying out the attack. But she also told the FBI she once drove him to the Pulse nightclub because he wanted to scope it out, the network said. Salman's mother, Ekbal Zahi Salman, lives in a middle-class neighborhood of the suburban town of Rodeo, California. A neighbor said Noor Salman only visited her mother once after she married Mateen.Noor Salman's mother "didn't like him very much. He didn't allow her (Noor) to come here," said neighbor Rajinder Chahal. He said he had spoken to Noor Salman's mother after the Orlando attack. "She was crying, weeping."OBAMA SLAMS TRUMPObama denounced Donald Trump for his proposed ban on Muslims entering the United States, joining fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton in portraying the Republican presidential candidate as unfit for the White House. Since the shooting, Trump criticized Obama for not using the term "radical Islamic terrorism" to describe violent Islamist militants. "What exactly would using this label accomplish, what exactly would it change?" Obama replied. "Someone seriously thinks we don't know who we're fighting? ... There's no magic to the phrase 'radical Islam.' It's a political talking point. It is not a strategy."Mateen made 911 calls from the club in which he pledged loyalty to the leader of Islamic State, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, whose organization controls parts of Iraq and Syria. He also claimed solidarity with the ethnic Chechen brothers who carried out the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing and with a Palestinian-American who became a suicide bomber in Syria for al Qaeda offshoot the Nusra Front, authorities said. "We could hear him talking to 911 saying that the reason why he's doing this is because he wants America to stop bombing his country. From that conversation from 911 he pledges allegiance to ISIS," said Patience Carter, 20, who was trapped in a bathroom stall at the nightclub as Mateen prowled outside. Carter, from Philadelphia, read a poem to the media that she said she wrote to help her heal."Looking at the blood and debris covered on everyone's faces. Looking at the gunman's feet under the stall as he paces. The guilt of feeling lucky to be alive is heavy," the poem read.U.S. officials were investigating media reports that Mateen may have been gay but not openly so, and questioning whether that could have driven his attack, according to two people who have been briefed on the investigation and requested anonymity to discuss it.A former wife of Mateen, Sitora Yusufiy, said her ex-husband had facets of his life that he did not share with his family, such as drinking and going to night clubs."He did have a different side to him that he could not open up to his father about," Yusufiy told CNN. She has previously said he was mentally unstable and beat her and that she fled their home after four months of marriage.The owner of Pulse, speaking through a representative, denied reports that Mateen had been a regular patron."Untrue and totally ridiculous," Sara Brady, a spokeswoman for club owner Barbara Poma, said in an email when asked about the claim.Mateen's father, Seddique Mateen, indicated soon after the attack that his son had harbored strong anti-gay feelings and on Tuesday he told reporters his son had never mentioned being homosexual."I don't believe he was a whatever you call it," he said. (Additional reporting by Eric Beech in Washington, Barbara Liston, Bernie Woodall and Yara Bayoumy in Orlando, Brendan O'Brien in Milwaukee, Wis., Zachary Fagenson in Port St. Lucie, Fla., and Alexandria Sage in Rodeo, Calif.; Writing by Alistair Bell and Fiona Ortiz; Editing by Peter Cooney and Nick Macfie)

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BRIEF-GE, HPE partner to deliver new industrial IoT solutions

June 8 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co:* GE and Hewlett Packard Enterprise partner to deliver new industrial IoT solutions * As part of this agreement, HPE will be preferred storage and server infrastructure provider for Predix Cloud Technologies * GE will also "leverage HPE technology for much of its virtual infrastructure as well as some OEM offerings" Source text for Eikon: Further company coverage:

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